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jimbo

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Posts: 59
Reply with quote  #16 
M, the first case of DNA being used as evidence in a criminal trial was in the UK in 1986, so I'm not sure intelligence level has anything to do with it as much as being included in the advanced scientific loop along with other Nobel winning scientists to be able to foresee that DNA will one day be used as evidence in criminal trials 16 years in the future.

Also, the technology to get DNA off stamps/saliva came even later than that.

So, I would have to disagree with you on this one.
margie11

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Posts: 356
Reply with quote  #17 
OKay - I have deleted my post about the dna..cuz everyone is thinking that i am stupid (and I dont completely disagree :) and plus it didnt sound very nice either. All I was trying to say was that Z knew codes..he knew how to not get caught for over 30 years..and none of the DNA has matched and I dont think that the DNA on the envelopes is the same as that on the stamps...and i dont even think that they have a full set of good prints...so I was just trying to make a point that perhaps...he didnt know that DNA would be used in the future..but knew enough of something to keep his DNA out/off the crime scenes for some reason....okay...I'll stop!
jimbo

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Reply with quote  #18 
M, don't stop!

One way we discover new things is by someone mentioning something an then someone else viewing it critically (in an objective manner, not personally) and responding.

Any suggestion here can lead to another that would have never been considered otherwise, it's already occurred a few times with me on this MB.

I totally believe one person's thoughts (whether accurate, valid, plausible or not) can stimulate another to think in ways not before considered.
margie11

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Posts: 356
Reply with quote  #19 
Thanks Jimbo...I wont stop then...I will keep rambling on and maybe we will get somewhere on this! :) I hope that the hood comes back with something...and I canot wait for the results!! :) All the pieces that we have been trying so hard to put together might all soon be falling into place!
jimbo

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Posts: 59
Reply with quote  #20 
I hear that!

I also hope this (Dennis' evidence) puts an end to such a bizarre and far reaching murderous crime spree once and for EVER!

I can't help but be reminded of all the lives that were lost and the loved ones they left behind. I hope for them this will bring all those years of pain to an end and give them some well deserved peace in their hearts and minds.


wildcatbn

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Posts: 41
Reply with quote  #21 
In the Mr. X theory they say Z used water to paste the stamps and envelopes so no DNA came from them. However there was a reddish brown hair behind one of the stamps that would have been from whoever had contact with the stamp when it was wet.
rrand

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Posts: 60
Reply with quote  #22 
It could have been purposely put there.
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jimbo

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Posts: 59
Reply with quote  #23 
R, true that!

Does anyone have an idea when hair matching was starting to be used as criminal evidence?

I would have to believe after fingerprints, but before DNA...
rrand

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Posts: 60
Reply with quote  #24 
I don't know but at least in 1974 Gaudette and Keeping had a paper published “An Attempt at Determining Probabilities in Human Scalp Hair Comparison” in the Journal of Forensic Sciences.
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margie11

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Posts: 356
Reply with quote  #25 
Ok - my dna thing is not feeling as stupid to me..if Z heard/read that hair might be tested...fingerprints could be tested...not a far leap to not want to leave saliva or skin on anything...thinking that one day they might be tested. maybe he didnt think "hey i bet one day they will test this stuff called dna and make a 1 in a billion match to a particular person...i better not leave any bodily fluids"...he was either very lucky to not leave anything anywhere...or it was purposeful.
jimbo

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Posts: 59
Reply with quote  #26 
Keep in mind, maybe it's not that he didn't leave any behind, maybe it's that no one collected it (properly or otherwise) what he did leave behind.

Forensic science has come a long way since 1968...


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Reply with quote  #27 
Blood group could often be determined from licked stamps at that time... Why lick them when you can use water?

unsub
rrand

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Posts: 60
Reply with quote  #28 
Interesting document here: Forensic Science Timeline (.pdf) .html

1831 Leuchs first noted amylase activity in human saliva.
1928 Meüller was the first medico-legal investigator to suggest the identification of salivary amlyase as a presumptive test for salivary stains.

And from HowStuffWorks:

...in 1930, scientist Karl Landsteiner won the Nobel Prize for classifying human blood into its various groups. His work paved the way for the future use of blood in criminal investigations. Other tests were developed in the mid-1900s to analyze saliva, semen and other body fluids as well as to make blood tests more precise.

Maybe they didn't test for DNA but blood types.

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ChadShaft

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Reply with quote  #29 
Maybe this has already been mentioned. But everyone is worrying about the DNA on the stamps. There's a possibility of the blood on the knifes that could match the DNA of the Lake Berryessa victims.
Karma

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Posts: 108
Reply with quote  #30 
So that would mean that Z was a forensic scientist.

Because in the 1960s there was no reason for an average citizen to assume that their identity could be gleaned from dried spit mixed with adhesive on a stamp.


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